Toliman (Guatemala)

Status Unknown Eruption Unknown 3158m
Stratovolcano(es) (Subduction zone / Continental crust (> 25 km))

Toliman

Volcán Tolimán is a large andesitic stratovolcano that rises above the S shore of Lake Atitlán. Tolimán was constructed within the Pleistocene Atitlán III caldera, near its inferred southern margin. A shallow elliptical crater truncates the summit, and a minor subsidiary peak to the SSW also has a shallow crater. In contrast to the tephra-covered surface of its twin volcano to the S, Volcán Atitlán, the surface is draped by prominent thick lava flows. Many of the flows were erupted from vents on the flanks and form a highly irregular shoreline on the S side of Lake Atitlán. No historical eruptions are known. However, a lava flow that entered Lake Atitlán from the parasitic lava dome of Cerro de Oro on the N flank was considered by Newhall et al. (1987) to be less than a few thousand years old based on the thickness of sediment accumulated on the sublacustral part of the flow.

Volcán Tolimán (center) towers above the south shore of scenic Lake Atitlán. Tolimán and its conical twin volcano Atitlán (upper left) were constructed within the Pleistocene Atitlán III caldera, near its inferred southern margin. In contrast to the tephra-covered surface of Volcán Atitlán, the surface of Tolimán is draped by prominent thick lava flows. The recent history of Tolimán is dominated by effusive eruptions from flank vents. The resulting lava flows extend into the lake and produce a highly irregular shoreline.

Photo by Bill Rose, 1972 (Michigan Technological University).

Last updated 2019-08-04 00:28:03

Camera (auto update every 1 minute)
Latest activity