Mojanda (Ecuador)

Status Normal Eruption Unknown 4263m
Stratovolcano(es) (Subduction zone / Continental crust (> 25 km))

Mojanda

Mojanda, one of the largest volcanoes of Ecuador's northern Interandean Depression, rises SW of the historic town of Otavalo. Volcán Mojanda has a complex geologic history involving two adjacent simultaneously active volcanoes. An earlier edifice contains remnants of a larger earlier caldera and a smaller summit caldera occupied by two lakes. The andesitic-to-rhyolitic Fuya Fuya volcano was constructed contemporaneously immediately to the west of Mojanda and produced two major rhyolitic plinian explosive eruptions, possibly associated with caldera formation. Fuya Fuya underwent edifice collapse less than 165,000 years ago, leaving a large horseshoe-shaped caldera open to the west. Subsequently, a new composite cone and dacitic lava domes were extruded inside the caldera. The youngest domes are unglaciated and of possible Holocene age.

Laguna Grande de Mojanda occupies the caldera of Mojanda volcano, one of the largest volcanoes of Ecuador's northern Interandean Depression. This view looks toward the rugged eastern rim of the caldera from the slopes of the post-caldera stratovolcano Fuya Fuya with Cerro Negro at the upper right. Laguna Grande de Mojanda is one of two lakes occupying a summit caldera cutting an older Mojanda edifice. Fuya Fuya volcano was constructed immediately to the west of Mojanda and produced two major rhyolitic plinian explosive eruptions.

Photo by Lee Siebert, 2006 (Smithsonian Institution).

Last updated 2019-12-03 09:00:03

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